384 – Moon Girl and the Prince

The lineup for EC Comics begins to shift at the end of 1947 after Max Gaines’ untimely boating death, when William Gaines takes over the reins. In December 1947, Moon Girl and the Prince debuts. Moon Girl is a girl from Samarkand who has super strength and a moon rock which gives her even more […]

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357 – Hedy Takes Over

For the first time, in May 1947, one of Timely (Marvel) Comics superhero magazines have been completely renamed and had its genre changed: The short-lived All-Winners Squad has been retired and “All Winners Comics” has been renamed to “Hedy De Vine”. Not to be confused with Patsy Walker’s nemesis Hedy Wolfe, Hedy De Vine is […]

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304 – More Funny

In January 1946, More Fun Comics #108 jettisons all four of its superheroes (Aquaman, Superboy, Johnny Quick, and Green Arrow) and replaces them with other humor strips like Genius Jones. Don’t worry – all of those superheroes make there way over to Adventure Comics next month (February 1946), but it doesn’t bode well for other […]

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276 – Captain Marvel Shenanigans

Well here we are closing out the tenth year of comic-book-dom and Captain Marvel continues to keep things light in the super-heroics department in Whiz Comics #61 (December 1944). Unlike Superman, his DC counterpart, Fawcett’s Captain Marvel had almost zero regular supporting cast, love interests, recurring villains, backstory, or continuity. The stories always stayed far […]

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47 – When Lois Met Clark

The Golden Age of Comic Books begins in May 1938 with the single most important comic book ever published:  Action Comics #1 and the debut of the first full-fledged superhero:  Superman.  Crime fighter for justice.  Crazy costume.  Super powers.  Secret identity.  A supporting cast of two Daily Star employees: his un-named editor and his romantic […]

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36 – Nadir, Master of Magic

New Adventure Comics #17 (June 1937) debuted a new hero:  Nadir, Master of Magic.  What I found interesting was the origin story told in the beginning that states: Because of a tragedy in his early life, which resulted in the death of his father and mother, he has devoted his life to the elimination of […]

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35 – Superheroes Never Stay Dead

Superheroes die all the time these days and are resurrected in various forms months or years later, so it’s kind of meaningless.  However, back in May 1937 it wasn’t so common, so I’m sure this cliffhanger where Doctor Occult is declared dead was upsetting to fans of Leger and Reuths’ “More Fun” strip.

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26 – Capes and Flying

August 1936 creeps the industry ever-closer to a full-fledged superhero, with Doctor Occult meeting The Seven, donning a skin-tight uniform with a symbol on its chest and a red cape, and then flying through the ether to Egypt.  Clearly Siegel and Shuster were playing with their crazy Superman idea in other strips. Note that this […]

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21 – Dr. Mystic nee Occult

March 1936 brings three more companies into the comic book publishing game:  Centaur Publications, United Features, David McKay.  Centaur Publications was formed by two former employees of National Allied Publications, John Mahon and Bill Cook.  Their flagship comic book is Comics Magazine #1, which includes a feature called “Dr. Mystic, Occult Detective”.  The feature is […]

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