42 – June Justis, G-Woman

New Adventure Comics #22 (December 1937) featured a one-shot story of June Justis, G-Woman.  June is a no-nonsense gal who is more feisty than Sandra of the Secret Service.  In this story she fights the bad guys, shoots to kill and solves the case single-handedly, capturing Public Enemy No. 1, Jake Shiller.

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41 – The Blood of the Lotus

After The Claws of the Red Dragon, Bruce Nelson continued his “yellow peril” adventures in Detective Comics.  Above shows a panel from the second chapter of “The Blood of the Lotus” in Detective Comics #10 (November 1937).  In it, they depict the heroin being drugged (with opium presumably), perhaps the second time drug use was […]

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40 – Sally Saves Bart

Sally Norris is mostly definitely not a damsel-in-distress and is continuing to prove her worth as Bart Regan’s partner / sidekick in “Spy”, by Detective Comics #9 (October 1937).  She bails out her boyfriend with tear gas from her purse (!) and rescues everyone.

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39 – Lala Palooza

In September 1937, Quality Comics debuted with Feature Funnies #1.  It mostly reprinted of strips that had already been published by other companies like Joe Palooka and Jane Arden.  It also featured Lala Palooza by Rube Goldberg, who became famous for “Rube Goldberg Machines“. Before it was a famous alternative music festival, Lollapalooza was a […]

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38 – Doctor Occult meets Henri Duval

The name of the villain in Doctor Occult‘s adventure from More Fun Comics #24 (August 1937) was Henri Duval.  This is the second time I’ve seen Jerry Siegel re-use a name of one of his characters (Jor-L being the first).

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37 – She

New Adventure Comics, by National Allied Productions featured a comic strip simply called “She“.  It is written by H. Rider Haggard, who died in 1925 (12 years before the comic was published).  It was illustrated by Sven Elven. Apparently “She” is Ayesha, a two-thousand-year-old immortal sorceress of such great beauty that she can bind any […]

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31 – Dope Fiend!

The Federal Men start the new year (January 1937) by taking a bite out of drugs, or something like that.  Steve Carson takes on a “dope” ring and is captured and threatened with becoming an addict.  Of course he escapes and arrests the ring leader. New Adventure Comics #13 also features a 12-page story “Foe […]

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30 – New Adventures for Federal Men

The science fiction angle continues for Siegel and Shuster in this Federal Men tale from December 1936.  In it, this four page “imaginary tale” from the futuristic year 2000 shows federal agent Jor-L fighting bandit queen Nira-Q.  The name Jor-L was of course re-used for Superman’s father on Krypton. This issue also shows the title […]

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29 – DC introduces DC

National Allied Publications started advertising their newest upcoming comic book title, “Detective Comics” in late 1936.  Above is a full-page ad inside New Comics #11, November 1936, though the magazine wouldn’t come out for three more months.  “Detective Comics” of course became the official name for the comic book company in the 1970s and years […]

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28 – Steve Smash Robot

Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster continue to lean heavy into the sci-fi angle for their comic strips.  In October 1936, New Comics #10 features Steve Carson, an FBI agent infiltrating a secret criminal organization and then heroically commandeering an out-of-control giant robot. I really love the art here by Joe Shuster, the use of the […]

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