357 – Hedy Takes Over

For the first time, in May 1947, one of Timely (Marvel) Comics superhero magazines have been completely renamed and had its genre changed: The short-lived All-Winners Squad has been retired and “All Winners Comics” has been renamed to “Hedy De Vine”. Not to be confused with Patsy Walker’s nemesis Hedy Wolfe, Hedy De Vine is […]

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335 – Farewell Newsboy Legion

In Star Spangled Comics #64 (November 1946), we say goodbye to another Golden Age creation from Jack Kirby and Joe Simon: the Newsboy Legion and the Guardian. Oh well, I can’t say I was ever really a fan :-/

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308 – The Three Dimwits Solo

The Flash’s comic relief supporting characters (Winky, Blinky and Noddy – cheap knockoffs of the Three Stooges) make their first solo appearance in All-American Comics #73 (March 1946). This is another signal of non-superhero / humor comics becoming more prominent. Phew! only a few more years of this stuff to go through before the Golden […]

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304 – More Funny

In January 1946, More Fun Comics #108 jettisons all four of its superheroes (Aquaman, Superboy, Johnny Quick, and Green Arrow) and replaces them with other humor strips like Genius Jones. Don’t worry – all of those superheroes make there way over to Adventure Comics next month (February 1946), but it doesn’t bode well for other […]

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147 – Fire + Water = Steamed Nazis

In Marvel Mystery Comics 317 (January 1941), the Human Torch and Namor appear together again, but this time as allies fighting the Nazis. The two still spar a bit with each other before they learn to cooperate. I had no idea this hallmark of Marvel Comics existed from the Golden Age!

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146 – Julie Breaks It Off

Sorry Bruce, but you’ve been hanging out with the boy too much and you won’t pick up the phone at night. Julie Madison breaks off the engagement to Bruce Wayne (Batman) in Detective Comics #49 (January 1941). This is the last appearance of Julie Madison in the Golden Age. Presumably she did well with her […]

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79 – The Angel

The third superhero introduced in Marvel Comics #1 (August 1939), was The Angel, created by Paul Gustavson. The Angel that would not see success beyond the Golden Age of Comics, though he did give his name to one of the original X-Men, much like The Human Torch was reborn as a different character in the […]

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47 – When Lois Met Clark

The Golden Age of Comic Books begins in May 1938 with the single most important comic book ever published:  Action Comics #1 and the debut of the first full-fledged superhero:  Superman.  Crime fighter for justice.  Crazy costume.  Super powers.  Secret identity.  A supporting cast of two Daily Star employees: his un-named editor and his romantic […]

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